About your Search

20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
administered by a treasury chief who didn't pay his taxes for which we will be taxed for four years before any benefits take effect by the government which has already bankrupted social security and medicare all to be overseen by a surgeon general who is obese -- [laughter] and financed by a country that's broke. [laughter] megyn: well, there you have it. or do you? joining me now for a fair and balanced debate, dr. marc siegel and stanley hepfeld who's a hospital ceo, also the author of "political malpractice." gentlemen, thank you both so much for being here. so, you know, they say -- people who don't like obamacare say that doctor and politician summed up the problems with obamacare brilliantly in one sentence. i assume you agree, dr. segal, but the she is whether -- the question is whether there's anything that could happen tonight that would be a game changer on an issue you find very problematic. i mean, health care's sort of been forgotten about since the supreme court upheld the law. >> well, megyn, i'll add one game changer here. you might say that doctors are a special interest group
we need time to fix it, and by the way, the president will also say that he wants to increase taxes on people like mitt romney to help pay down some of that debt. >> reporter: we just put of that graphic there showing the $16 trillion of debt and there are so many digits it almost doesn't fit on the tv screen across the screen there, as you can see. but haven't americans in some way become number to astronomical numbers? how serious is this in. >> they have become number. is it the new normal this massive spilling of red ink but it raises three problems which i don't think the nation has got even to grips with yet. number one our economy is smaller than our debt. we look like europe, we know what happened there. number two we are spending $9 billion every week just paying interest on this debt, about a quarter of it goes overseas. and number 3, we are paying for this debt by printing money. so here is the question, allison, what happens when we stop printing as we inevitably will at some point, what happens when people stop lending us the money because we've borrowed so much. what h
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)